The Official Site of Author Joseph Heywood
JoeRoads.com: The Official Blog of Author Joe Heywood
17 Oct

Ending the Day

Dinner with Don Madorski at the Pine Stump Eatery. Full moon rising through the pines to the east. Good night all. Over.

 

Northern Goshawk,  near Lake Superior Beach, this afternoon.

Northern Goshawk, near Lake Superior Beach, this afternoon.

Full Moon in Luce Lace

Full Moon in Luce Lace

 

17 Oct

Just Waking Up

DAY 151, October 17, 2013 , DEER PARK — Hit the five-month mark yesterday, and last night, another middle-of-the-night writing session, and another draft short story, this one called “Gravy.”  No idea of length. It’s handwritten at this point, which is normal, amounting to a dozen yellow dog sheets. Second this week.  Jambe Longue and the mutt greeted the morning sun without me. I didn’t roll out of bed until 0930. NW winds for three days, now down to light westerly, there should be good agate hunting on the beach today and tonight we are having dinner tonight with our pal Don Madorski and his dog Jake at the Pine Stump Eatery.  Long-time resident of Lake Superior’s shore, Don is the former “Mayor of deer Park.” Our days here are closing fast, but the writing goes on unrelenting. A good thing. Another short story tonight, I hope. The first one two days ago began when I wrote the opening line in the flyleaf of a book I was reading at lunch in Newberry. This latest one began with a vivid dream in which these two characters were having an interesting conversation. it woke me up and I came out here and let if flow through my wrists, as a great writer used to put it. Now to fully wake up. It’s 40 outside, will prolly be chilly on the beach. Over.

I look out on the sparkling lake and think, Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds.

I look out on the sparkling lake and think, Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds.

How this morning began.

How this morning began.

16 Oct

Generation Pride

Not so many years ago I had a fine soccer player named Lori Visser. She was a star player, tough as nails and captained us. Now her daughter Emily Morin is a starting freshman inside fullback at Michigan Tech. Glad to see the line continue with such grace and aplomb

She even runs like her mom, Elbows up!

She even runs like her mom, Elbows up!

16 Oct

Manuscript.

Least Flycatcher, found dead on Tuesday. First one we've ever seen dead .or alive. We found it south of Newberry,

Least Flycatcher, found dead on Tuesday. First one we’ve ever seen dead .or alive. We found it south of Newberry,

I handed  the first full draft of MOUNTAINS OF THE MISGBEGOTTEN to Jambe Longue today for her reading pleasure.  Lute Bapcat’s second installment.  Huzzah!

Finito.Now to may agent and from her to my editor at Lyons.

Finito.Now to may agent and from her to my editor at Lyons.

15 Oct

On Craft and Creation

Playwright Edward Albee (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) on writing: “I will discover one day that I am thinking about a new play, which means that it’s been in my unconscious and I am informing  my conscious mind that I have been thinking about it. I’ll put it back again. I’ll forget about it. It will pop up a few weeks later and I will discover that I thought more about it. The characters appear. ‘Hello, here we are.’ Pirandello  time. In effect, they say Write us. I make experiments with my characters before I trust them in a play of mine. I will do a form of actor’s improvisation. I’ll take a long walk on the beach with the characters, who I plan to have in the play I haven’t written yet. I will put them in a situation that won’t be in the play, and I will improvise dialogue for them and see how well I know them.

“Gradually  the play takes shape – before a word  is written down. In contrast to those playwrights who are hopelessly didactic and plot everything out.” Albee makes no notes and there is no outline. In this head, there is the “playwright’s file cabinet,” in which he places things he has heard or seen.” He tells us, “I make the assumption that the play knocks on the conscious part of my brain, which is why it keeps coming into focus before I write it down.” When he senses that the work is ready, he begins to write in longhand (his handwriting is difficult to read – even for him). “When I start putting a play to paper, I have no idea what the first line is going to be. I have some idea of the destination, some flash of how it’s going to end, but I have no idea how I’m going to get from the beginning to the end. But then the reality of the situations and the characters take over.”

On the subject of titles, Albee once saw “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” scribbled on a mirror in a  Bar and he never forgot it, and when the play was written, this became the title. Sheer serendipity and to some extent luck, but writers, if they are good, are what Saul Bellow once called, “First-class noticers.” Cops and game wardens call it situational awareness, that is actually seeing and taking on board what you are looking at, hearing or smelling,.

I think I made this point in an earlier blog – that most of the writing and story formulation takes place over a long period of time in your mind before you put  pen to paper.  It’s nice to see similarities in how others do the work. Over.

14 Oct

Bright Beginnings

Bookended by sunrise.

Bookended by sunrise.

DAY 148, DEER PARK, October 14, 2013 – Jambe Longue is up taking sunrise photos and the dog is out cold on our bed. Ah morning in Paradise (the concept, not the town). Over.

Morning in Full Glory

Morning in Full Glory

Sunrise looking south and west.

Sunrise looking south and west.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pitcher of pitcher-taker between pitcher takes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sleeper.

 

13 Oct

You Know Halloween Must Be Approaching

If you find junk like this out in the woods.

Skeletons in the Woods

Skeletons in the Woods

13 Oct

Autumn Shroomers

 

Spent a bit this afternoon letting the mutt ruin and searching for shrooms out on Coast Guard Road. Working off descriptions from a friend, we found quite a haul of armillaria mellea, or honey mushrooms. Unfortunately we had them in a bag with some that were not honeys. And our friend’s book said they were not edible. Asked our friend, you eat these? “All my life. You have to boil them twice.” ‘fraid not. I dumped them all. But it was fun and pretty and the dog had  a ball on his two-hour all-out run. Photos follow. Over.

Sunday sunrise.

Sunday sunrise.

Reindeer lichen.

Reindeer lichen.

Bed of lichen

Bed of lichen

Coast Guard Road

Coast Guard Road

Two-tracks, everywhere you look!

Two-tracks, everywhere you look!

Morning light.

Morning light.

 

12 Oct

Maas En Mass

Pal Peter Maas was in Marlboro Mass and he spied a joint and went inside. Let him explain: “The place looked inviting.  Walked in, ordered a beer and a bowl of chowder.  Slapped my loose change on the table and waited for somebody to break out the cards. Nothing.  Had to watch the Bruins on the big-screen instead. 

In winter we convene with a crusty bunch of old newspaper types who call themselves Gazette Geezers, and we play a very bizarre and entertaining card game called 99. I think Peter’s notion was entirely correct in assuming he was entering a card-hall. But it is Mass and things there can be a little diff than the rest of the world. Over.

False Advertising.

False Advertising.

12 Oct

Sunshine Becomes Rainshine

Snap of the fingers, a bit threatening and dark as in photo, then POW! Heavy rain.

Official greeter for red squirrels.

Official greeter for red squirrels.

Not rain, then rain, pronto subito.

Not rain, then rain, pronto subito.

Home   |   About   |   Blog   |   Tour   |   Links   |   Contact   |   Events   |   Forum

Copyright © 2008 Joseph Heywood. Design by C Marschke.