The Official Site of Author Joseph Heywood
JoeRoads.com: The Official Blog of Author Joe Heywood
08 Sep

Wolves on the Prowl

Photos by Sherry Peek, taken at her bear bait site. Nice pix, beautiuful, healthy looking animals.

Sherry Peek Wolf 5 Sherry Peek wolf 4 Sherry Peek wolf 3 Sherry Peek wolf 1

08 Sep

Facing the Turn: A Seasonal Tale

DAY 129, Monday, Sept 8, ALBERTA — The fall turn happens both gradually and suddenly, in drips and drabs, a little like Chinese Water Torture.

In spring we were seeing up to fifty robins a day, but since sometime in July: zed, none, zero. T

The hummingbird males were one day no longer here and now we have only females and youngsters, all with the same low tolerance for others of their own kind. Were humans hummers, and in possession of weapons with more firepower than beaks or wings, the human race might perish en masse in short order. We have no idea the route the hummers take, but given where we are, perhaps they fly south in swarms over Wisconsin en route to Mexico. Do they stop along the way? Don’t know. If so, we should see waves here as those north of us push through. All we know is that one day the endless line to our feeders will stop abruptly and the little birds so fascinating to watch will become ghost memories until next spring.

Yesterday Lonnie saw a juvenile yellow belly sapsucker and today saw the juvenile and two adults in the same place. Based on our books they are moving through here to the south.

Our local colony of cliff swallows, perhaps 40 or more, left for the south two weeks early. Snow buntings came in one month early, here in late August instead of late September.

Yesterday we made our Sunday newspaper run (CHICAGO TRIBUNE and NEW YORK TIMES, GREEN BAY, DETROIT, HOUGHTON and MARQUETTE  newspapers) Trib and NYT) and gassed up and watched a couple dozen yellow-headed blackbird females and juveniles plucking dragonflies along the Keweenaw Bay shoreline. A first sighting on these birds. They are also migrating.

Our supposedly rare Brewer’s blackbirds (they were here all summer), formed into flocks within the past two weeks, hopped all over the campus, foraging like an army on the move and living off the land.

Local sightings of wolves crossing the hardtop roads are on the upswing as the wolves start moving from their summer focus on small mammals in their rendevous areas, to deer and they are starting to move, one must assume towards areas where deer congregate. We know of a “heavy” wolf concentration area to the west of us and one day soon will take a ride over that way to see what we can see.

Black bears are reported to be tearing down bird feeders, etc, and breaking into small outbuildings, this despite a huge mast and berry crop. Thimbleberries, wild strawberries, and razzies are done for the season. Bloobs are on the downswing, but there are still blackberries ripening. From all we’ve heard this was not a big thimbleberry year.

Late this week, the weather gremlins are saying, we’ll have highs of 50 and lows in the mid-thirties, for several days. We will have to start covering our veggies, which are still growing on vines and plants. Our hot red peppers have yielded only two little firecrackers thus far, but there are more than a hundred on the small bush. They need time.

Everyday brings less light and more colored leaves to the ground. The color splash is still in the hint stage, but the full show is inevitable.

The campus expanses of lawn are covered with beautiful yellow Canada hawkweed, who politely fold up in the evening, bring the law color back to green. They don’t reopen in the morning until the sun gets high, this morning it was after 10:30 A.M.

Cluster flies are beginning to try to enter dwellings to ride out winter. They are disgusting things and by spring there will be piles of desiccated little corpses between all the windows and we will have to vaccuum them out as a first order of business in spring. We don’t remember cluster flies being a problem over in the EUP, but perhaps our circumstances were different. 

This morning we had swarming flocks of goldfinches, the males were peacefully enjoying thistle on the feeder while moms kept watch on the young ones who are just learning to aviate and were showing various levels of aptitude, some of them a little on the wobbly and clumsy side. We watched a half dozen little ones land on the tomato plants to find food or eat on the tops of the veggie support sticks.

Eighteen sand hill cranes flew over Lonnie this morning, en route to a staging area to make larger flocks. These seem a little early, but we remember Deer Park where they simply disappeared one day.

Football is under way at all levels: high school, through pro.

Fishermen have been whacking salmon in Keweenaw Bay all summer, but now they are starting up the rivers, the kings leading the way, soon to be followed by cohos and pinks. We have not yet waded the rivers for cohos yet, but plan to.

It will be no time before bird hunters are afield and we heard so many more birds drumming this past spring than we ever heard or saw in the EUP. Hunting ought to be good, at least around here.

One bear guide told me he’s baiting 25 sites and I’m not sure if it’s yet legal to bait. Don’t know if he’s strictly a bait guide, or runs hounds too.  Too much braggadoccio to take seriously.

Bow hunters are out on the two tracks and dirt roads scouting, sucking down road brews and joints (legal marijuana, no doubt). 

The whole fall circus show is set to begin and everyone is talking out loud about the need for a good Indian summer, which is that nice period after the first hard frosts lay in.

Though fall is the season of an ending, it is the season many outdoorsmen look to with the most ardor and for good reason as good fishing and hunting opportunities of all sorts set in. yesterday we followed a small SUV all the way across the Plains Road, two youngsters inside and we could smell their dope clouds rolling back on us and my head’s always plugged by allergies, so if I can smell the skunk-weed, you know there’s a thick cloud built up inside.

Our own southerly migration is ahead. We will not be sorry to leave winter behind — the kind of winter up here that makes the winters in Kalamazoo a joke. Snow in the Keweenaw last season was almost 400 inches. Ground frost got down ten feet in many places and all sorts of people had burst pipes. The usual winter up here, a Yooper lady told us one day, is a lot of snow, or a lot of bad cold, but last year was both and that made it really bad. She ran out of wood in December, and had another load brought in March and was out in February on land she and her husband own along cliff drive, cutting five foot lengths of firewood,  and buried her four-wheeler in the snow and had to abandon it and leave it there for the duration of winter. No complaints in any of this, not even any awe, just a straight report on how it was and is, which is finally how Yoopers deal with tough circumstances. They rarely whine: they just cope. Good lessons for all of us. 

It will be good to get back south to see loved ones and friends, but it is always tough to leave this place called the Upper Peninsula, which is special in our hearts.

Over.

 

 

07 Sep

Oot and Aboot in Da Kopper Koun’ree

Rolled Early yesterday to attend an auction in Hancock, a first for both of us. Lovely setting, it spawned a poem and we might have stayed if we had any idea what the hell the plan and its timing were, but no one seemed to want to share, and we moved on  to Lake Linden and on down to White City and Jacobsville, back to Lake Linden, then up to Mohawk and down to Calumet to sign stock at Copper World on Fifth Street and had nice conversation with the proprietors and some fans as well. It was a day filled with interesting random  images, which follow, and of course our visit to Mowhawk to the Wood’n Spoon and a new supply of raison safron cookies! (COOKIE-COOKIE-COOKIE!) Finally home a day’s end to listen to MSU get ass-kicked by Whoregon U.  Let the sharing begin now. We had a far better day than the Spartoons.

Auction at 311 Water Street

The aged living gather like hyenas above the ship canal to paw through the stuff of the dearly departed, assign value, we call this an auction,complete with rental eats (isn’t all food rented?) The regular viewers, like Evanovich’s Grandma Mazur, bring their own folding decampchairs, set them up in a half moon around the up-sloping driveway of cracked cement, form lines to circulate through goat trails of detritus, white hairs all, brain-locked by mass acquisition bargain disorder, not a terminal disease, but a symptom mayhaps, you’d think folks of a certain age would have enough stuff of their own by now. I find myself thinking of mortally wounded Roman generals sweeping their robes over their faces to hide the rictus of death, but are we not each and all mortally wounded by birth? Here there is motion absent emotion, neutered neutrality of onlooking without contemplation, the focus is on stuff, stuff, see…STUFF? Only  the ghosting sounds of slipper-shuffling of we en masse elderkinder, shovers-pushers-leaners-stumblers caterpillaring fronts-to -backs in congress of conga lines through rooms and no evidence of organization anywhere to be seen, only a stentorian auctioneer trying to convince his groupies how cool he is, “ever’ item to be sold on its own an’ mebbe some in groups, but don’t know thet yet, guess you folks’ll have to stick aroun’ to find out,” and I am thinking of all the days it may take to deplete the inventory of the dead and no wonder there is a pop-up concession stand, which elevates magically, like a Slo-Mo rabbit from a silk hat, this  from a trailer pulled by a mouse-sized SUV. The morning sun seems to illuminate hoary heads of strollers and I am thinking it is god’s pointer going each to the other, or side by each, trying to decide who next to call up or send down, like a Big League Club’s GM  getting ready for the playoffs. It is that time of year for baseball and life. Yooper matter-of-factness holds the high ground here, an old fellow (my age) and I are looking at shelves of native copper skulls of two-hand heft. The old guy croaks softly, “Armanalegalldatestuffeh?” Stuff, no acquisitions, mementos, crop or even shit, just a neutral stuff, a word of distant respect if not for those who gather, then for the item itself, ars cum grano salis.

[September 6, Hancock, Michigan]

Over, youse enjoy da pitchers, hey.

DNA = Damn Near Art

DNA = Damn Near Art

Jacobsville sandstone and cedar shingles, very cool and rustic.

Jacobsville sandstone and cedar shingles, very cool and rustic.

Translates to, Art with a grain of salt."

Translates to, Art with a grain of salt.”

Indian signal tree, or hackcident?

Indian signal tree, or hackcident?

Even ordinary things can have their own beauty.

Even ordinary things can have their own beauty.

Playing with shadows

Playing with shadows

Canada Hawkweed in the late summer sun

Canada Hawkweed in the late summer sun

A reminder of regional sympathies so deep they are carved into trees.

A reminder of regional sympathies so deep they are carved into trees.

Art district.

Art district.

Books and buildings, nice combo.

Books and buildings, nice combo.

Free advertising. Almost.

Free advertising. Almost.

 

03 Sep

Another First

Today we sample our first ground cherries. Flavor something of a mix of pineapple and sweet tomato? We’re going to try them on vanilla ice cream. Who knew? You don’t have to pick them. When they’re ripe, they fall to the ground, courtesy of  Mrs. Gravit. They have a paperish leaf all around them, very fine, like foolscap paper.  Photo follows and a photo of Lonnie’s latest mobile creation, created from drfitwood and beach glass from Lake Superior, and Keweenaw copper. She calls this one, “Wild Treasure.” Cool. They take a while to make. Over.

Garrrround cherrieeez. Pick up from ground, pull off the paper, and eat

Garrrround cherrieeez. Pick up from ground, pull off the paper, and eat

"Wild Treasure"

“Wild Treasure”

02 Sep

On Books and Personal Libraries

DAY 123, September 2, 2014, ALBERTA –My brothers and I grew up as a library kids. In our own  military brathood lifestyle we used to cycle from time to time between assignments, meaning the old man went ahead of us to establish a base, and we  often spent weeks or months at my grandparent’s home in my birthplace, on the banks of the Hudson River, about 20 miles north of Poughkeepsie and 40 miles south of Albany. The town of Kingston is directly across the river.  We had a fine view of the Catskill Mountains, known locally as the Yiddish Alps.

By the time the village took its current name of Rhinecliff, it had already been a village for 150 years, formerly known as Kipsbergen, which was founded in 1686, nine decades before the revolution, which created our independent country. At 328 years old, Rhinecliff has not changed all that much and it is in my heart, my true birth home, the place that wherever I wander, I always relate back to.

There was a Boy’s Club in Rhinecliff, which met weekly at the Morton Memorial Library and Community House, one of those once-a-week-lets-make-crap-with-plywood, using coping saws with blades as thin as dog hair. Truth told, I was not much on woodworking, but I loved books and reading. I would halfheartedly and dutifully cut  wood for a while, and then sneak upstairs to the  stacks where Mrs. Maude Zegelbrier was the honcho. Mrs. Z described her job as the village’s book hander-outer, an august  job she held for 35 years. She eventually  let me skip woodworking entirely, and come sit Indian-legged between stacks where I was free to explore anything on a shelf, no restrictions, no rules, no warnings. It was a place where I could follow my young fancy (meaning ignorance), even if it meant staring at the breasts of south sea dancing women in NATIONAL GEOGRAPHICS, which  I did.  Most happily and studiously.

I still have strong emotions for the smell of old books and poorly lit library shelves, and squeaky wooden floors.

Our home was one with books. Same with my other relatives, as I remember it, which we know  is no guarantee of anything other than wishful thinking sometimes. I grew up loving books, reading them and possessing them.

To this day when I enter a strange house I look to see if there are books on shelves and a dog. These are weaknesses of my personality, not on the part of others because there are valid reasons for not having canine company, or books on shelves. Still, no dog and no books makes me a bit edgy.

But all of this is off the point — if there is a point to this at all. I have just finished reading an essay entitled “Packing My Father in Law’s Library.” It appears in James Wood’s THE FUN STUFF (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2012). Wood is a wonderful writer and and unorthodox and interesting thinker. The piece concerns what to do with his late F-I-L’s library The F-I-L had retired to Ontario and left his collection was 4,000 volumes, a fair-size treasure of dead trees.

When my own collection was last counted, some years ago, it was in excess of 20,000 volumes (and altitude at which Oxygen is required, not optional). Wood’s essay, if it did nothing else, made it clear to me I need to make time to do a full inventory and think about what to do with all the volumes in my many rooms. I have extensive collections of fiction, Michigan history, Russian/USSR history, Chinese History, Japanese history, and World War II. My approach to reading is far from unique. When I find an author who captures my attention, I tend to collect and read everything he or she has published. Others no doubt pursue the same tactic, and my collection mirrors my interests and has no greater organizing or collecting principle than that. What it is for me is a true working library because I (egad!) write notes in margins, underline and otherwise desecrate so-called collectible volumes. Some of what I underline I transfer into notebooks on various topics and themes. Pristine and virginal this collection is surely not, but then neither am I.

Wood tells us that we tend to venerate libraries once we know whose they are and there’s some truth to this, I suppose if you are of the exalted stations of what the Japanese call yimina shosetka, or famous author. Me, I fall into the step-below class of just plain-brown envelope  shosetka, author. I vaguely realize that all those rooms of books represent a potential burden to my survivors, and that in a surge of uncharacteristic decency, it might be appropriate for me to  simplify and shorten the bench. Sumimasen, I  USE my books, and while not at all organized with Dewey Decimal  precision, The horde is organized, roughly. Which means I can usually lay-hand on what I need in short order, which it the whole purpose in having the bloody things around.

The notion of selling them or donating them and breaking apart large chunks of resources brings a buzzing palsy upon me. I know many nice people, friends even, who subscribe to the notion of clean desk, clean mind. I’m not one of them. Clean desk to me means unused desk, not enough work to do and such limited scope in thinking that there is a neat file for everything with nothing falling into no-man’s-land. Yuck. These remind me of the MBA kids who’ve been taught to read it once and move it on, or to write 80 percent or 90 percent of what’s needed and let another person wordsmith the rest.

Just as I like having some clutter, I also am addicted to doodling while listening to people speak and there is research only recently announced showing that doodlers retain more than most non-doodlers. Wood points out that there is a line of thinking that much can be learned about a man by his choice of books. I suppose his choice of movies would fit there just as nicely. Perhaps it is so. I have people asking me (quite often) for reading recommendations. I  generally put myself in mumble mode when this happens because we all read for our own reasons and what I like or find compelling may put you to sleep.

Case in point I am reading a recent Pulitzer novel that is akin to crawling through quicksand in waders. I absolutely LOATHE the central character and mind you,  this is 154 pages out of the harbor. I truly appreciate recommendations, but rarely find them satisfying and perhaps this is why I am so reluctant to make reading recommendations to others. The exceptions here are my children, all of who are wonderful deep readers and rarely steer me wrong. I guess the gene pool is fairly tight; all of us like good writing, the subject and genre, etc, being largely irrelevant. And we don’t care if the writing is contemporary or 400 years old. Good is good and age or era irrelevant.

It may be that some of us collect books in a quietly ostentatious manner – which is to say,  to show off (the novelist’s dictum being  show don’t tell).  This may be true, even applied to me. What I do know is that many people seek comfort as they age and they tend to read things that underline, underscore, and reinforce what they already think.  In contrast, I try to read things that are from people I don’t think I have much agreement with  politically or philosophically. I like taking my own beliefs and turning them topsy turvy, putting a new lens on them to see how they hold up and one of the best ways to do this is to read the notions of people you may not agree with, but you won’t know this until you read what they offer. I try to be this way, but often fall short of my intended open-mindedness.

What I do, however, is pursue a lot of subjects I know nothing about and in learning new things I often find things I already think put into a new and interesting light. I used to think of this as an American trait, but I think I’m wrong on that. We are as close-minded as a people as any in the world.

Wood pointed out in the course of his essay that in the English church (Anglican) the Bishop of Canterbury is officially known as the “Primate of All England.” Wood asks, “Does that mean he should be called Chief Chimp?” I recently read the results of  national survey (Pew) on Christians in the U.S. The poll showed that 10 percent of those who call themselves Christian  believe Joan of Arc was Noah’s wife. This is not a joke. I just shook my head.

Today at Fob’s restaurant in Crystal Falls I heard a woman insisting loudly  that teachers who taught only five years in Illinois would collect 100K-a-year pensions. Clearly she was badly misinformed and full of fecal matter.  Her companion was heard to say, “They pay that much money for that kind of work?’  He was an engineer and complained teachers were better paid than his kind. But where does this sort of thinking come from?

Writers and artists tend to see differently than others. Differently, not necessarily better.

Virginia Woolf once wrote: “An ordinary mind on an ordinary day amasses impressions haphazardly, inattentively, and keeps a latent but later accessible stock of…encounters from which rises a sense of self, which is then the product of its conditioning by this random accumulation.”

Ergo,  we might reasonably  conclude from Ms Woolf’s description of how we pull in information,  that some folks might come to think Joan of Arc is Noah’s old lady.

This scattered approach to observing and experiencing life is one reason people make less-than-ideal eyewitnesses.  Ask any cop. We all claim to look, but as it turns out, few of us actually see and probably none of us see fully all the time.  

We saw two moose today, which advanced our summer count from un to trois and whilst books and reading and writing afford immeasurable pleasures, the sighting of things rare living creatures  in our environment trumps all else, at least for the moment.

I hear a bed calling my name. Over.

02 Sep

More From A Day on the Move

Naturally we had to make a check on Cook’s Run, one of the UP’s most reliable trout streams. Few streams can offer prettier get-ins. And we found an odd random sign outside an antique emporium, no idea what we are supposed to take from it. And returning home we found a tourist parked across our road. Very thoughtful of him.

Great parking, dude.

Great parking, dude.

Ulh, okay.

Ulh, okay.

We LOVE bubble lines.

We LOVE bubble lines.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Something from a Harry Potter world.

Something from a Harry Potter world.

Cook's Run in Iron County. Even the looks of it are blue ribbon.

Cook’s Run in Iron County. Even the looks of it are blue ribbon.

02 Sep

Iron County Spin

Took a big spin through Iron County today, and caught a cow and calf moose on the way home. Lonnie got a couple of nice shots.

Mama and baby wondering what that sound was.

Mama and baby wondering what that sound was.

Mom-moose on the lookout while junior grazes behind and to her right.

Mom-moose on the lookout while junior grazes behind and to her right.

29 Aug

Watching the Fall

DAY 119, Friday August 29, 2014, Michigan Tech Ford Campus, ALBERTA- The forestry students are here at Ford Center, hard at work in the classroom normal people call Da Woods. Nights are, as Limpy Allerdyce would put it, coldening fast. Ferns go from green to brown, ignoring the yellow phase. Days are getting shorter, nights longer. The whole aster family seems to be in bloom, and fireweed too. Mice are trying to get inside. We are finding little corpses every day. Cluster flies will start in two weeks, looking for safe haven in houses, there to die, as if the places we live in are mausoleums. The stores have Halloween crap on display beside back to school supplies and our locals kids will be back in class next week. Last night we heard the season’s first high school football game, an eight-man tilt between Rapid River and Ewen Trout Creek with Rapid River winning 26-0. Next week ETC travels to Engadine. Gold finch ladies, have turned winter green already and the males are starting to display greenish shadows on their bright yellow feathers. We have flocks of Brewer’s blackbirds every morning, in the dozens as flocks gather and move south. The Brewers are the only blackbirds we’ve seen this summer and they are said by BIRDS OF MICHIGAN  to be uncommon here in the state. Not so here on the Ford Campus. Getting reports of bears in birdfeeders, a common spring phenomenon, not fall. And we have a huge mass crop and berries galore, which makes one wonder if the winter ahead is gonna be what my pal Bill Moomaw used to call a “Blinger.” We are seeing fewer and fewer male rudes (Evinrudes = Hummingbirds) and we are thinking the main male migratory cloud has left the station as the girls and little ones prepare to follow. Our count is nearing 26,000 for spring and summer, but tapering quickly. Counting them is of course a hit or miss and approximate thing, but still the rough count offers a sense of what’s roiling around us. Already there is silence when we step onto the porch, no screaming from dozens of the little bullets on perches in the maple tree or lilac bush. Trees are starting to change. We are seeing oranges, and in the past couple of days, reds. Colored leaves are falling here and there, adding little dollops of color to the lawns. And Michigan State starts the Spartan football season tonight. Amazingly, we can listen to games this year, on Ontonagon’s WUPY-FM, 101.1. For the last five years we were caught in the Deer Park aural null and on occasion I could sit in the truck and hear the Spartans play. This fall I can sit right at my work table and listen and curse and bitch and grouse and carry on, because it isn’t really Spartan football unless the alums are grousing. My late father in law would get so upset at games that he would hastily gather up the clan and march them out to the cars for the short run home, to suffer the rest of the game with martininis in hand. This behavior following  the group’s late arrival, and parking at the player entrance on Spartan Stadium’s north end.  Still remember Dutch exchange student Dirk Krijt kicking five field goals to beat Ohio State 15-zip and all the game smoking cigarettes on the sideline. Them were the days. Just as deer hunters purport to know more about deer than multiply-degreed professional biologists who manage the state herds, some MSU fans are sure they know a helluva lot more about Xs and Os than the professional coaching staff in East Lansing. Fun days ahead, and the color spectacular as well. Yesterday I finished an interesting short story with the title, Olly Olly In Free and last night started another called Alone, Mostly, and this morning wrote down a couple of notes for yet another to be called “Nothing to Offer At the Gate of Eternity.” Life has some sweet moments and behooves us all to such them up while we are in them, knowing that it ain’t always so. Should share that I was with Limpy the other day when a picture of a bare chested Boris Putin popped up on the TV and Limpy gasped and pointed. “What’s with that Russky asshole Sputum prancin’ around showin’ off his pectittorals?” I didn’t have an answer for Limpy. Some things in this life are like that.

Go State.

Over.

28 Aug

Writing Continues

Alberta, Michigan, August 28, 2014 — Another short story into the bin tonight, title, “Olly Olly In Free.”

27 Aug

On the Road on Hump Day

We took off from our Alberta home base about 0730 and headed up to Laurium for breakfast at Toni’s. Then over to the Keweenaw National Historic  Park’s Calumet Visitor’s Center, where the Friend of the Porkies are displaying various pieces of art from former artists in residence. Lonnie and I had  a wonderful two-week tour back in 2006 and I gave them a large painting entitle, “When the Artist Is Away.” And a cartoon journal they could use for fund raising, which they have since converted to T-shirts. Haven’t seen the painting since then-Ontonagon Librarian Eric Smith loaded it in his car to take back to the Friends of the Porkies. Lonnie and I both forgot how big it is. But the exhibit is beautiful, the space premo and here are some photos so you can have a look-see. After this we picked agates fro a couple of hours, found a half dozen, nothing spectacular, then drove up to the Phoenix Mine poor rock pile and found not just some small pieces of copper, but some blackberries, which we dutifully harvested.  We were back here 11 hours after we shoved off. A full, long day, with perfect 65 degree weather and a blue sky with light winds. Over.

Critical Eye

Critical Eye

Bozo With the Brush

Bozo With the Brush

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Painting Title

Painting Title

Long view.

Long view.

Other featured work

Other featured work

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Home   |   About   |   Blog   |   Tour   |   Links   |   Contact   |   Events   |   Forum

Copyright © 2008 Joseph Heywood. Design by C Marschke.